Slideshow Image 5 Slideshow Image 1 Slideshow Image 2 Slideshow Image 3 Slideshow Image 7 Slideshow Image 4 Slideshow Image 6

Desert Endurance Multisport Coaching provides exceptional personalized multisport coaching. At DE I strive to help my clients achieve their fitness and race performance goals while providing the education and tools necessary to train and perform at the highest possible level. I believe that ongoing communication between athlete and coach is crucial to success.

Desert Endurance Multisport Coaching News

DE Athlete Giselle B's Puerto Rico 70.3 Race Report: Race Report: Ironman 70.3...

DE Athlete Giselle B's Puerto Rico 70.3 Race Report:

Race Report: Ironman 70.3 Puerto Rico
As some of you know, I was born and raised in Puerto Rico and moved to Tucson just over 7 years ago. So after falling in love with triathlon and when the possibility of doing a half-Ironman crossed my mind, you can imagine why this has been my dream race for a while now.

Puerto Rico 70.3 is my second half-Iron distance triathlon (I completed the Soma Triathlon in Tempe last October) and both were huge learning experiences not only about the sport but about myself too!

Race Morning:

Something magical happened and I was able to get a solid 7 hours of sleep the night before. This is rare because I’m usually not able to sleep well or much at all before big races. Got out of bed around 4:15am. I was pretty calm, got dressed and packed last minute stuff. I eat really slow when nervous so I gave myself ample time to swallow my oatmeal (thanks Christian for making it for me!) with strawberries and almonds. My friend Vanessa (2 x Ironman finisher woot!!) came by our hotel room with a surprise 70.3 Finisher chocolate cake. Woo hoo, motivation to cross the finish line!

Setting up the transition area went pretty smoothly, especially with tips from Vanessa. But the nerves and stress soon started to kick in as we walked to the swim start (about a 1/4 mile away).

Swim:

I’ll start by saying that the swim venue, the Condado Lagoon, is beautiful! I think I’ve been spoiled and now won’t be able to look at a pool the same way again. ::sighs:: Oh well, back to the race…

Luckily, I had done a practice swim in the lagoon the day before and that helped calm my nerves just a little bit. A few minutes before my wave’s swim start my parents, little brother and little sister showed up. I almost teared up when I saw them. OMG, they were going to see me in that crazy swim start!! Before I knew it, I was in the water and swimming. The start was rough, and honestly, most of the swim was too. I was kicked and pushed by my wave and by all the waves that caught up to me. Unfortunately, I never felt like I found my rhythm and was never able to relax into a consistent pace. Oh, and I swear my goggles are cursed. Water started leaking in (just like in Soma). I was able to make it to the turn around buoys and then flagged a volunteer on a kayak and stopped to adjust my goggles. Luckily, I had no goggle issues after that.

I kept fighting my way to the swim out. Literally fighting, kicking at the swimmers that were grabbing at my feet and pushing my way around those that were pushing me. It was rough! We left the protected waters of the lagoon for the last 300 meters or so and that’s when I realized the waves were making me dizzy! That was a new feeling for me while swimming. :) I reached the swim out ramp, had the volunteers pull me out and walked a few steps before I start my jog to T1.

Time: 58:43

T1:
The transition area was set up in a stadium, about a 1/4 mile from the swim out. I saw that a lot of athletes left shoes at swim out to make the run to T1 easier. I had decided to not do that so I endured the hard pavement for a little while. Don’t remember much of T1, except how hard it was to stuff 2 gels inside the pockets of my wet tri top. All other nutrition I had already packed in my bento box. My head was still spinning a little bit from the swim and the run to T1, so I took it easy out of T1.

Time: 0:06:45

Bike:

The.wind.was.BRUTAL! But of course, this meant that I had an awesome tail wind riding out of San Juan and for the first half of the ride. The bike course was from San Juan to the city of Dorado with two loops with turn arounds at miles 20 and then at mile 29.

I was able to average around 19mph with the tail wind on my way to Dorado. I very much enjoyed the bike leg. The ride was along the coast most of the time. The waves crashing on the shore and the beautiful beaches were a great distraction. The roads were, to my surprise, in pretty good condition. The spectators cheering on the bike course were also a blessing, and the volunteers at the aid stations were super helpful and encouraging. With 3 bottles on my bike I only had to stop once to refill.

Returning to San Juan was really hard. The head wind turned it into a miserable, slow and dry ride back. I was extremely frustrated with all the drafting I saw - crossed my mind to throw bottles at these cyclists but I knew I was going to need my water. I saw the official’s motorcycle pass me a few times so I hope they gave penalties (or at the very least yelled) at the cyclists in violation. I later read somewhere on Facebook that quite a few penalties were given. Good. Because I was busting my little ass off with that wind!

About 5 miles away from the bike finish my rear shifting stopped working. Yay. Those were some really long 5 miles but luckily there were quite a few down hills and rollers so I could just coast my way there. At least once, the doubt of me not being able to do the half-marathon entered my mind. The games the mind plays on you! I was really grumpy when I made it to T2.

Lesson Learned: It doesn’t matter how busy you are, give your bike a tune up before important races! I’m blessed that my husband is bike savvy, but we were both really busy on the weeks leading up to this race. I unfortunately, underestimated the amount of maintenance my bike needed. Turns out, my gears stopped working because the rear shifting cable snapped. Had this happened earlier in the ride, it could have been the end of my race!

Time: 3:46:26

T2: Now that I’m writing this race report, I realize that my transition memories are very blurry. Maybe this is a good thing, since even though I don’t remember my transitions, they went well? Maybe I finally know what I’m doing in transition? Haha! Now they need to be faster…

Time: 0:05:00

Run:

I heard they call this race the “Beauty and the Beast” and I think it is mostly because of those 13.1 miles of beautiful hell we need to endure. The half-marathon route takes us through the northern part of Old San Juan, with beautiful views of the ocean, the Capitol building, El Morro and other Spanish-era architecture. It is a very hilly route, two loops. I trained in the Saguaro National Park and still found the Old San Juan hills to be steeper, harder and I had to walk more than I anticipated. The first 3 miles or so are a party, with music, lots of spectators and volunteers. Later in the route, residents were standing out there hosing down runners. I’m so thankful for that because it was really hot - 80 degrees with 74% humidity.

My priority throughout the whole run was to keep my body temperature down. I had grabbed an ice-filled ziplock bag from a volunteer early in the run and stuck it in my sports bra. Also filled my hat with ice in every aid station. My second priority was nutrition, and this was harder because at that point I was delirious and did not feel like eating haha. I think I had a total of 3 power gels in the run, 1 orange at an aid station and gatorade. That seemed to help me pull through, though about a mile from the finish line I was getting pretty hungry.

The energy of the spectators was awesome. Running through Old San Juan was exciting and at that point it finally dawned on me that my dream was coming true. Even if I had to walk all the way there, I was going to finish the PR 70.3! Dodging tourists was also fun. I probably sounded all grumpy saying “get out of the way! excuse me!” but I was giggling inside at how oblivious and distracted some of them were. There’s a race happening people!

Seeing my family and friends in the run was probably the best part. My uncle ran with me part of the last stretch and recorded a video. At that point I could barely talk but I was grateful for the encouragement.

Lesson Learned: Train for the terrain you’re running on race day, as best as you can. Ice is your friend in hot and humid races and don’t forget about your nutrition. Nutrition is crucial if you want to make it to the finish line! Encourage your fellow triathletes, it won’t cost you any competitiveness and it’ll make both you and the other athlete smile, inspire you and give you a sense of camaraderie. Trust me, sometimes that’s enough to push you through the toughest parts of your race.

Time: 2:55:43

Total Race Time: 7:52:36

Bottom Line: If you’ve thought about IM 70.3 Puerto Rico as a destination race… DO IT! I don’t think the pictures we took give the venue and course any justice. The swim venue is perfect. The bike course is beautiful, mostly flat, albeit windy. The run course is to die for (hopefully not literally? haha!), however also challenging and hilly. The race organization, I thought, was great and of course the volunteers were awesome. The host hotels, The Caribe Hilton and the Condado Plaza Hilton, are very conveniently located near transition and swim start (although, pricey I think even with the IM discount. But there are tons of lodging options not far away).

The race amnesia has kicked in I think, so I will return to do it next year with Christian! Woo hoo!!

Track DE Athlete Giselle B tomorrow at Puerto Rico 70.3! Bib 309 Go Giselle!!!

Track DE Athlete Giselle B tomorrow at Puerto Rico 70.3!
Bib 309
Go Giselle!!!


IRONMAN.com | Official Site of IRONMAN, IRONMAN 70.3, 5i50, Iron Girl and IRONKIDS | Triathlon...
www.ironman.com
The Official Site of IRONMAN, IRONMAN 70.3, 5i50, Iron Girl and IRONKIDS triathlon races, registration, results, course descriptions, training articles, and live coverage of our iconic events such as the IRONMAN World Championship in Kona, Hawaii.

Do you recognize the **star** of this video for Garmin's newest bike computer? D...

Do you recognize the **star** of this video for Garmin's newest bike computer?
DE Athlete Christian M!!


Garmin Edge 1000
The New Garmin Edge 1000, Official video.

DE will be hosting a SAG at Windy Point on Sat April 12th from 8:30-9:30am. Ic...

DE will be hosting a SAG at Windy Point on Sat April 12th from 8:30-9:30am.

Ice cold drinks and delicious snacks to help get you up to the top of the mountain!

Good luck to DE athletes Matt S racing the Marquee OLY and Dana D racing the Sab...

Good luck to DE athletes Matt S racing the Marquee OLY and Dana D racing the Sabino Sunset Run this weekend!

Sending tiny full of AWESOME vibes to DE Athlete Giselle B racing Puerto Rico 70...

Sending tiny full of AWESOME vibes to DE Athlete Giselle B racing Puerto Rico 70.3 this weekend! Race hard and have a GREAT few days with your family!!

Big thanks to On Your Left Fitness for an AWESOME RACE TODAY! The inaugural Oro...

Big thanks to On Your Left Fitness for an AWESOME RACE TODAY! The inaugural Oro Valley Sprint tri was sooooo much fun!

Shout out to all of our athletes who rep-pre-ZENTed! Giselle, Holly (photographer), Matt (volunteer), Christian, and Dana.

Christy H 1st Pl AG, DE relay 2nd Pl (Julie H, Mike I , and Kay W) TJ and his Speedo 2nd Pl AG, Kate L 2nd Pl AG, Lisa A 3rd Pl AG, Tom M 2nd Pl AG.

LOVE our DE Team!

Woo Hoo!!

Woo Hoo!!

http://profile.ak.fbcdn.net/hprofile-ak-ash3/t1.0-1/p100x100/44592_147991765225649_3294603_a.jpg

On Your Left Fitness
Packet Pickup is tomorrow (April 4) at Fleet Feet Tucson (Oro Valley location) from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Be sure to come out and visit a few vendors at the mini expo too: Metal Parts, Kinetic Power, Summit Hut, Trek Bicycles of Tucson. Remember: PHOTO ID AND USAT CARD (if you are a USAT member) REQUIRED.